Mary O'Leary Wiley, PhD, ABPP

Board Certified Psychologist

read more

Individual Psychotherapy and Counseling for Adults

Mary O'Leary Wiley, PhD, ABPP
Board Certified Psychologist

3701 Burgoon Road
Altoona, PA 16602-1715

Phone: (814) 942-4045
Fax: (814) 944-0419

Specializing In

Depression
Anxiety
Trauma Survival
Disordered Eating
Adoption Issues
Health and Wellness Concerns
Spirituality and Emotional Well-being
Parenting Concerns
Life Planning
Building Strength & Resilience

About Dr. Wiley

Mary O'Leary Wiley, Ph.D. is a Board Certified Psychologist. She received her doctorate from the University of Maryland in 1982, having received her Bachelor's degree from Penn State and her Masters degree from the University of Maryland. She served as Staff Psychologist at Ithaca College in New York from 1982-1985 and was appointed Director of Psychological Services there from 1985-1988. Dr. Wiley then moved to the Washington, DC area and began a private practice in 1989. This practice grew to include seven mental health specialists and was called Psychological Solutions in Gaithersburg, Maryland. She began practice here in her native Altoona in 1995.

Dr. Wiley specializes in the individual treatment of adults and college students experiencing depression, anxiety, panic attacks, relationship concerns, grief and loss, eating disorders, adoption issues, adult Attention Deficit Disorder and Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Dr. Wiley has been active nationally in her profession. She served as Vice President for Professional Practice for the Division of Counseling Psychology in the American Psychological Association from 2000-2003. She completed a four-year term on the Editorial Board of The Counseling Psychologist (1997-2000), and has served on the Editorial Board of Professional Psychology: Research and Practice (1989-1992) and as a reviewer for the Journal of Counseling Psychology. She has served as National Chair of the Section on Independent Practice for the Division of Counseling Psychology of the American Psychological Association, and is former President of the Adoption Therapy Coalition. She is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, and a member of the Pennsylvania Psychological Association and Central Pennsylvania Psychological Association.

 

Links

Therapeutic Yoga & Mindfulness Program for Anxiety & Depression

Research has shown that yoga and mindfulness assist people in recovering from depression, anxiety and trauma. During this 6-week program, participants cultivate a more positive relationship with their bodies through mindfulness, breathing, gentle yoga movements and relaxation and self-care techniques. The program is designed to focus and calm the mind and to support the health and well-being of the whole person. Join this small group and learn practical ways to reduce stress throughout your daily life. The group is an adjunct to individual therapy and therefore all participants must be in therapy with an individual therapist. Please contact Dr. Wiley for more details.

Before You Arrive

When you arrive for your first appointment with Dr. Wiley, please bring with you the forms found in the links below. This will allow both you and Dr. Wiley to focus exclusively on you and your goals for psychotherapy.

Just print out the forms, complete them and bring them to your first session.

The first form is an overview of Dr. Wiley and her practice policies. The second form is a brief intake form that allows Dr. Wiley to gather important information about you that will be needed for both treatment and billing purposes. The third form is the Holmes Stress Scale, which is a measure of current environmental stress. The fourth form is an Agreement for Services that spells out some of the expectations of the professional relationship, as well as the legal limits to confidentiality. The final form is a HIPAA Privacy Notice that your provider is required to offer to you that details your privacy rights under HIPAA.

 

Forms

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Psychological Services

What is psychotherapy?

Receiving treatment for emotional concerns is different than receiving treatment for physical concerns. Psychotherapy is a collaborative process between you and your therapist. It can only be as effective as the energy you put into it. You must be totally honest with yourself and your therapist regarding your symptoms, your life history and your concerns. It is only in this way that your therapist can know what is really going on for you. Unlike physicians, who can examine a patient and hear or see symptoms, a psychologist can only know what you tell him or her. Therapists are not mind readers. It is also important that you participate fully in your treatment by completing all assignments (such as journal keeping or reading assignments) between sessions. Not completing assignments will slow down your recovery--and we both want you to feel better as quickly as you can.

How do I choose a therapist?

First, check with people you know well, your clergy or your physician for recommendations. Psychologists and therapists specialize in different things, so you want to first make a list of two to four people who specialize in your concerns. For example, if you are looking for treatment for a ten-year-old child, make sure the people on your list specialize in children. Next, check out the people on your list using the Internet. Read their websites and learn about their backgrounds and approaches. Finally, call two to three different psychologists or therapists and find out if you feel comfortable talking with them. Plus be sure they have openings and are taking new clients. Finally, be sure their office hours match your schedule. You want to assure yourself that your psychologist has the proper professional qualifications.

How long does psychotherapy usually take?

Therapy is only effective if you and I meet on a very regular basis. This means that we will choose a 50-minute therapy appointment time once a week. That time will be reserved for you and you alone. Cancellations or missed sessions are very disruptive to good therapy, and you must do everything you can to avoid them. Cancellations must be made at least 24 hours prior to the appointment in order to avoid being charged for the missed session, unless there is a snow emergency or you are very ill. Unfortunately, my schedule is very full, so rescheduling appointments is usually difficult.

It is always hard to predict how long successful psychotherapy will take. Some clients chose to come for only five or six sessions, others come for over a year. It depends on two factors. First, what would you like to get out of therapy? Changing longstanding behavior patterns takes longer than changing a reaction to a current stressor, for example. Second, how much improvement is "good enough" for you? Some people prefer simply to get over a crisis, while others are interested in changing the nature of their character, which necessitates longer treatment.

What if I miss or must cancel a therapy appointment?

Cancellations or missed sessions are very disruptive to good therapy, and you must to everything you can to avoid them. Cancellations must be made at least 24 hours prior to the appointment in order to avoid being charged for the missed session, unless there is a snow emergency or you are very ill. Unfortunately, my schedule is very full, so rescheduling appointments is usually difficult.

What can I expect in my initial session?

The purpose of the initial session with a psychotherapist is to gather information from you about your concerns and your life, to make progress toward establishing a working evaluation of the problem and goals for treatment, and to answer any questions that you may have. Fees and appointment times will be discussed and clarified.

Is the information discussed in psychotherapy considered confidential?

Information shared with Dr. Wiley in psychotherapy is confidential, and is privileged communication under Pennsylvania state law. If you wish me to speak with someone, you must sign a release of information form that will permit me to do this. This includes signing a release of information if you wish me to file claims with your insurance company, or if your insurance requires regular information in order to authorize additional sessions. Confidentiality does not apply only in three unusual circumstances: (a) You are, in your therapist's opinion, in imminent danger to yourself or others; (b) A child is, in your therapist's opinion, being abused or neglected; and (c) A court issues a subpoena. Each of these is extremely rare and on occasions when they have occurred in the past, I have always discussed it with my clients in advance.

Will my health insurance cover the cost?

Every person's insurance policy is different, and I believe that you should personally be familiar with your own benefits. Therefore I encourage you to call your insurance company to ask what your benefits are for outpatient psychotherapy. You are responsible for knowing what the limits are on your benefits, such as number of sessions per year, co-pay or yearly deductible. If you are in extreme psychological distress and cannot call to verify your benefits, I will phone on your behalf. Please ask me in your first session about any intrusions that your insurance company makes into the treatment process, such as their requirements for treatment plans or a heavy focus on short-term treatment.

I am a preferred provider for many different insurance plans. For these policies, I am required to submit bills directly to them. For others, you will be required to submit your bills. However, remember that you are responsible for payment of your bills, and for knowing your own policy limitations.

If I am covered by health insurance, who is responsible for payment?

My fee is $125 a session and $175 for the first session. I ask that clients pay a fee at the time of each session, either the full fee or the co-payment portion if we have verified that the insurance company will cover a percentage. Most people find that coming with their check already made out allows us the full session to talk about your concerns. For people with inadequate insurance coverage or with very difficult financial circumstances, I sometimes work out extended payment plans. Please discuss this with me. In extremely rare circumstances if you do not pay your bills, I use the assistance of a collection agency.

Contact Dr Wiley

3701 Burgoon Road
Altoona, PA 16602-1715
Phone: (814) 942-4045
Fax: (814) 944-0419

Oops! Unfortunately the message could not be sent, please refresh the page and try again.
Thank You! Your message was sent successfully.

Directions from Downtown Altoona

Head southwest on 9th Avenue and proceed toward 11th Street where you will make a left onto 22nd Street. You will then proceed and at the second right, turn right onto 7th Avenue were you will proceed until W. 6th Avenue. Turn left at the second street which is N. Logan Blvd. Turn right onto Burgoon Rd. and Dr. Wiley's office will be on your left.

Directions from Downtown Hollidaysburg

Head west on South Juniata Street toward Union Street and take the first right onto Union Street. Make the first right onto Blair Street and then take the first left onto PA-36 N/ Penn Street. Follow that and continue onto South Logan Blvd. Make a left on to Burgoon Rd. and Dr. Wiley's office will be on the left.

Directions from Duncansville

Head west on 3rd Avenue toward 13th Street. Turn onto PA- 764 N/ PA- 22 W/ 6th Avenue. Follow this road until you make a slight right onto Burgoon Road and Dr. Wiley's office will be on the right.

Directions from Ebensburg

Head aast on PA -22 E for roughly 17 miles and exit off of PA-22 E at the Hollidaysburg/Duncansville PA 764 exit. Stay left at the fork in the road and follow the signs for PA-764 N/Altoona and merge onto PA-764 N. Make a slight right onto Burgoon Road and Dr. Wiley's office will be on your right.

Directions from State College

Head southeast on S. Allen Street toward Highland Avenue. Make the first right onto Highland Avenue and proceed onto Highland Alley. Turn right onto US-322 BUS W/S Atherton Street. Take the ramp to I-99 S/ US-220 S/ US-322 W. Keep left at the fork, follow the signs for I-99 S/US-220 S/US-322 W/Altoona/Philipsburg and merge onto I-99 S/US-220 S/US-322 W. Continue to follow I-99 S/US-220 S for 38 miles. Take exit 31 for Plank Road then turn right onto US-220 BUS N/W Plank Street and then turn left onto S. Logan Blvd. Make a left onto Burgoon Road and Dr. Wiley's office will be on your left.

Directions from Bedford

Merge onto US-220 N and follow that until you merge onto I-99 N. Take exit 31 for W. Plank Road then proceed left onto S. Logan Blvd. Make a left onto Burgoon Road and Dr. Wiley's office will be on your left.